• About Julie

    NJ native without the accent or the big hair. Currently residing in Beijing. Teaching English. Absorbing all things China. Exploring SE Asia.

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    Feel free to drop me a message: juliekhull at gmail

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The Great Wall

In Chinese, the Great Wall of China is chang cheng (长城), which means “long wall.”  It is indeed long and built along the highest ridges of the hills, and we visited the Mutianyu section on Saturday.

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We’ve been busy!

Jenny and Amanda are here until Monday, and we’ve been busy going everywhere and seeing everything.

Old Summer Palace

Temple of Heaven

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Guilin vacation pictures

Jenny and Amanda arrived in Beijing yesterday and their jet-lagged selves are zonked out on the living room floor right now.  It’s been a longer-than-usual absence, but here are finally some pictures from Guilin.

All ready to head out to the airport!

Shire Hobbit coffee

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Congrats, Caitlin!

Sixteen years ago, there were three:

Christmas 1993

Fast forward a few years (and another sibling), to three years ago:

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Best vacation quote ever

Anna to Chinese woman:  “So, what does dog taste like?  Is it similar to chicken?”

Chinese woman:  “It tastes like cat.”

Michelle and I on the Li Jiang

More pictures to come…

Yushu earthquake pictures

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An eggstraveganza

Each year we, the foreign teachers, have a huge Easter egg hunt.  We got all the eggs ready on Wednesday for hiding some time next week.  There are several thousand of them, and each contains a slip of paper saying, “Return this egg to the foreign teacher’s office and you could win 100 yuan!”  (100 yuan is about $14.50.)  Only one egg gets the 100 yuan prize and some get other prizes, but everyone gets candy.  We usually lose a lot of eggs each year because the kids would rather keep the plastic egg than give it back to us and get some candy.  They all say things like, “Teacher, the egg is so small and cute!  I want to keep it!”  (The Chinese have a propensity for small cute things that I can’t quite figure out, like college students loving Hello Kitty.  But that’s another post for another time.)  Continue reading