• About Julie

    NJ native without the accent or the big hair. Currently residing in Beijing. Teaching English. Absorbing all things China. Exploring SE Asia.

    Thanks for visiting!

    Feel free to drop me a message: juliekhull at gmail

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to my blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 14 other followers

  • Most Popular This Week

The PRC: one big family

What goes into making a coffee table book filled with pictures of China’s many peoples?  1 year, 56 ethnic groups, and 5.7 million photographs went into such a book, which is titled, “Harmonious China: A Sketch of China’s 56 Ethnicities.”  Each ethnic group is shown through a family portrait, its young and old positioned amongst indigenous food, traditional clothing, and native backdrop.

Take, for example, the Bouyei people of Guizhou province (and also Sichuan and Yunnan provinces, and Vietnam).  This minority group lives in south-western China, numbers 2.5 million, and speaks a Tai language.  The Bouyei are pictured here:

The majority of China’s population is ethnic Han.

You might recognize this ethnic group from western China because they’ve been in the news a lot this year as it relates to Guantanamo Bay.

Another ethnic group is the Dai people from Yunnan province.  There is a Dai restaurant about two miles away from my school; we eat there often and the food is delicious.

Check out all of China’s 56 ethnic group portraits here.  Don’t get scared by all the Chinese characters.  It’s all I see everyday here in Beijing and you’re really only looking for the pictures.  : )

Advertisements

2 Responses

  1. […] For instance, city living vs. country living, province, ethnic group (did you know that China has 56 ethnic groups?), spacing between children, income level, etc.  Depending on these factors, there are actually […]

  2. […] These pictures of the earthquake that happened five days ago in southern Qinghai, China, and others, are on this Flickr site.  Take a closer look at the people and their clothes.  About half of the people in this region are Tibetan or part of some other minority group. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s